Adapting Swansea: Planning for future flood risks

WHAT WILL SWANSEA AND CAVES BEACH LOOK LIKE IN THE FUTURE?

Thank you to everyone that came along to the Community Drop-in Workshop on Tuesday 6 August. The evening was a great success with more than 100 community members attending the event.

Read the latest hazard summaries for Swansea and surrounds.

The Project

Living by the coast and lake in Swansea is a great lifestyle, and it is important that we manage this dynamic environment and plan for the future.

Lake Macquarie is a tidal lake, so water levels are expected to rise at the same rate as the ocean. Swansea has many low-lying areas that are already impacted by flooding or inundation during king tides. As sea levels rise, the number of properties exposed to storm flooding and/or tidal inundation, and the frequency of these natural events, will increase.

Council is committed to keeping our community safe from climatic events into the future. Decisions we make now can have lasting impacts. New roads, drains and homes built today will still be around in 50 to 100 years, so we have to plan for the future now.


WHAT WILL SWANSEA AND CAVES BEACH LOOK LIKE IN THE FUTURE?

Thank you to everyone that came along to the Community Drop-in Workshop on Tuesday 6 August. The evening was a great success with more than 100 community members attending the event.

Read the latest hazard summaries for Swansea and surrounds.

The Project

Living by the coast and lake in Swansea is a great lifestyle, and it is important that we manage this dynamic environment and plan for the future.

Lake Macquarie is a tidal lake, so water levels are expected to rise at the same rate as the ocean. Swansea has many low-lying areas that are already impacted by flooding or inundation during king tides. As sea levels rise, the number of properties exposed to storm flooding and/or tidal inundation, and the frequency of these natural events, will increase.

Council is committed to keeping our community safe from climatic events into the future. Decisions we make now can have lasting impacts. New roads, drains and homes built today will still be around in 50 to 100 years, so we have to plan for the future now.


  • Upcoming talks in October for planning for future flood risks

    about 1 year ago
    1 booragul foreshore   lake   scenic %288%29

    Let’s talk: Planning for Future Flood Risks

    Join expert Dennys Angove, local community representatives and Council at two upcoming information talks to better understand the science of climate change and learn more about adaptation planning through the experience of previous plans.


    Understanding the Science of Climate Change with Dr Dennys Angove

    Wednesday 10 October, 1-2.30pm,The Swansea Centre, 228 Pacific Highway, Swansea

    View more information about this talk.


    Hazards, risks and precincts in adaptation planning

    Monday 15 October, 3-4.30pm, The Swansea Centre, 228 Pacific Highway, Swansea

    View more information about this talk.



    Dr Angove is an atmospheric chemist and previously the...

    Let’s talk: Planning for Future Flood Risks

    Join expert Dennys Angove, local community representatives and Council at two upcoming information talks to better understand the science of climate change and learn more about adaptation planning through the experience of previous plans.


    Understanding the Science of Climate Change with Dr Dennys Angove

    Wednesday 10 October, 1-2.30pm,The Swansea Centre, 228 Pacific Highway, Swansea

    View more information about this talk.


    Hazards, risks and precincts in adaptation planning

    Monday 15 October, 3-4.30pm, The Swansea Centre, 228 Pacific Highway, Swansea

    View more information about this talk.



    Dr Angove is an atmospheric chemist and previously the Principal Research Scientist from the CSIRO Energy Flagship and atmospheric chemistry lecturer at the University of Technology, Sydney. Dr Angove has a GDip.Ed. and a PhD in physical chemistry from Macquarie University.


  • Great turnout for the first community workshop

    about 1 year ago
    Img 6528

    Last night, 40 community members attended the inaugural Swansea Local Adaptation Planning meeting, involving a workshop to explore the impacts of future sea level rise and flood risks.

    The room was alive with discussion and many great suggestions and shared flooding experiences were received from local residents, educators and business people, emergency services representatives and industry professionals.

    Manager Sustainability, Alice Howe, said the night was a great start to the adaptation planning process and preparing to work together as a community.

    “Working with local people and key representative from industry and emergency services is an...

    Last night, 40 community members attended the inaugural Swansea Local Adaptation Planning meeting, involving a workshop to explore the impacts of future sea level rise and flood risks.

    The room was alive with discussion and many great suggestions and shared flooding experiences were received from local residents, educators and business people, emergency services representatives and industry professionals.

    Manager Sustainability, Alice Howe, said the night was a great start to the adaptation planning process and preparing to work together as a community.

    “Working with local people and key representative from industry and emergency services is an integral part of the local adaptation process. Council cannot do it alone and we thank everyone who came along to the workshop,” Dr Howe said.

    “Together, we need to take the lead in preparing for the likely the impacts of climate change. This is particularly important in low-lying suburbs like Swansea.”

    “New roads, drains and homes built today will likely be around for at least 50 years, so we have to plan for the future now.”

    “We encourage everyone with an interest in the future of Swansea to get involved with the project and share their experiences and local knowledge of the area.”

    Get involved! There will be ongoing opportunities to contribute to the Swansea Local Adaptation Plan. To find out about the project and information collected so far, or to share your feedback online visit shape.lakemac.com.au/adapting-swansea or call 4921 0333.

  • Community input sought for Swansea Local Adaptation Plan

    about 1 year ago
    Swansea channel foreshore shared path

    Community input is being sought to develop an adaptation plan for flooding in Swansea.

    The process of formulating a Local Adaptation Plan for the waterfront suburb begins on Saturday with the first in a series of community drop-in sessions, at Swansea Markets.

    Lake Macquarie City Council Manager Planning and Sustainability, Alice Howe, said the plan would outline ways to allow people to live and build in Swansea as lake and sea levels continue to rise.

    “Similar Local Adaptation Plans have already been successfully introduced or are under development in other parts of our City and Swansea is the next low-lying...

    Community input is being sought to develop an adaptation plan for flooding in Swansea.

    The process of formulating a Local Adaptation Plan for the waterfront suburb begins on Saturday with the first in a series of community drop-in sessions, at Swansea Markets.

    Lake Macquarie City Council Manager Planning and Sustainability, Alice Howe, said the plan would outline ways to allow people to live and build in Swansea as lake and sea levels continue to rise.

    “Similar Local Adaptation Plans have already been successfully introduced or are under development in other parts of our City and Swansea is the next low-lying area to be addressed,” Dr Howe said.

    “We need to take the lead in preparing for the likely the impacts of climate change. This is particularly important in low-lying suburbs like Swansea.”

    More than 5000 people live in Swansea, according to the 2016 Census. The suburb’s flat topography means it is already susceptible to inundation during king tides and severe storm events, and after extreme rainfall.

    Dr Howe said community input into the Local Adaptation Plan was crucial to determine the best outcomes for local people.

    “New roads, drains and homes built today will likely be around for at least 50 years, so we have to plan for the future now,” Dr Howe said.

    “We want to hear from the local community about their experiences and ideas, and we encourage them to share their local knowledge and any photos that might be relevant.”

    A community workshop will be held 6pm-8.30pm, Tuesday 14 August at the Swansea Centre, 222 Pacific Highway.

    Residents can also complete a survey on the subject.

    Dr Howe said Local Adaptation Plans stemmed from Council’s Lake Macquarie Flood Risk Management Study and Plan, adopted in 2012.

    “This document recommended development of specific Local Adaptation Plans to address flood risks in each low-lying area around the lake,” Dr Howe said.

    “Local government is responsible for managing local flood risks in NSW, so we must take action accordingly.”

    “The Swansea Local Adaptation Plan will identify achievable and affordable actions to prepare for and respond to increased levels of flooding and sea level rise expected in the future.”

    Lake Macquarie’s first Local Adaptation Plan covered Marks Point and Belmont South. A second plan is underway for Pelican and Blacksmiths.

    Swansea Local Adaptation Plan Community Drop In Sessions

    Saturday 28 July 8am-noon: Swansea Markets, Quinn Park, Swansea

    Thursday 2 August 3-5pm: Swansea Public School Hall, Rawson Street, Swansea

    Saturday 4 August 9.30-11.30am: Outside Coles, Pacific Highway, Swansea

    Thursday 9 August 5-7pm: Outside Woolworths, Josephson Street, Swansea