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Welcome to Lake Mac City's community engagement hub.

We're committed to working with you to understand your views, concerns, aspirations and knowledge, to guide our decision-making process.

Our online community engagement hub, Shape Lake Mac provides you with the opportunity to offer genuine input into a broad range of projects, activities and decisions of Council. The hub also gives us an avenue to communicate decisions and activities.

Please read through the document library and FAQs, and if you can't find what you’re looking for, then please contact us.

Welcome to Lake Mac City's community engagement hub.

We're committed to working with you to understand your views, concerns, aspirations and knowledge, to guide our decision-making process.

Our online community engagement hub, Shape Lake Mac provides you with the opportunity to offer genuine input into a broad range of projects, activities and decisions of Council. The hub also gives us an avenue to communicate decisions and activities.

Please read through the document library and FAQs, and if you can't find what you’re looking for, then please contact us.

  • Draft plan outlines consistent development contributions for Lake Mac businesses

    9 days ago
    Section 712

    Commercial and business development in Lake Macquarie will be levied differently under a draft Council contributions plan.

    The draft plan proposes that non-residential development be levied for new public amenities and services based on the value of their development.

    Head of Development and Planning Justin Day said most funds collected from the levy would be allocated for public amenities and services.

    “Under the current system, development is levied based on a calculation of ‘peak vehicle trips’ generated,” Mr Day said.

    “This can create anomalies where relatively small businesses that generate high volumes of traffic are levied disproportionately, compared to the...

    Commercial and business development in Lake Macquarie will be levied differently under a draft Council contributions plan.

    The draft plan proposes that non-residential development be levied for new public amenities and services based on the value of their development.

    Head of Development and Planning Justin Day said most funds collected from the levy would be allocated for public amenities and services.

    “Under the current system, development is levied based on a calculation of ‘peak vehicle trips’ generated,” Mr Day said.

    “This can create anomalies where relatively small businesses that generate high volumes of traffic are levied disproportionately, compared to the value of their investment.

    “And, due to the structure of the contribution plan, in some cases development is not levied at all.”

    The new system, known as the s.7.12 Contributions Plan, features a much simpler, flat fee structure based on the value of development.

    Business and commercial developments under $100,000 will be exempt from paying developer contributions, while those worth $100,000-$200,000 will pay only 0.5 per cent of the total development value.

    Development over $200,000 will contribute one per cent of the total development value.

    “Overall, the number of commercial and business developers levied will increase, but the amount each contributes will generally be significantly lower,” Mr Day said.

    “Adopting s.7.12 also aligns Lake Macquarie with other Hunter councils already using this approach to levying employment-generating development.”

    The draft plan will be on public exhibition at shape.lakemac.com.au/712-contributions from 13 April-12 May.


  • Draft Aboriginal Community Plan on public exhibition

    17 days ago
    Maree edwards with a torres strait islander performer at naidoc week celebrations

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Lake Macquarie will gain better access to services and facilities across the City under a draft five year Council plan.

    The draft Aboriginal Community Plan 2019-2023 Bayikulinan (to act in the future), outlines six key focus areas and more than 50 actions highlighting the successes and challenges of Aboriginal people living and working in Lake Macquarie.

    Council Aboriginal Community Development Officer Maree Edwards said the plan was developed following extensive consultation with the community.

    “The draft Plan highlights some of the positive outcomes that have already taken place in our community, and provides...

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Lake Macquarie will gain better access to services and facilities across the City under a draft five year Council plan.

    The draft Aboriginal Community Plan 2019-2023 Bayikulinan (to act in the future), outlines six key focus areas and more than 50 actions highlighting the successes and challenges of Aboriginal people living and working in Lake Macquarie.

    Council Aboriginal Community Development Officer Maree Edwards said the plan was developed following extensive consultation with the community.

    “The draft Plan highlights some of the positive outcomes that have already taken place in our community, and provides actions to be carried out across Council to address some of the community’s ongoing needs,” Ms Edwards said.

    The six key focus areas outlined in the draft plan are:

    • Cultural awareness and understanding;

    • Cultural celebrations;

    • Elders and people with disability;

    • Culture, country, heritage, language;

    • Children and young people; and

    • Partnerships, funding and support

    Ms Edwards said the draft plan aimed to improve Aboriginal people’s livelihood and cultural values, as well as enhance relationships between Council, community and service providers.

    “We want to build knowledge and understanding of, and respect for, Aboriginal culture and heritage, and improve issues still facing Aboriginal people today,” Ms Edwards said.

    “This plan will also help us recognise the achievements of Aboriginal people in our community and the organisations that support them.”

    Census data shows Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islanders account for 4.1 per cent of Lake Mac’s population – significantly higher than the national average of 2.8 per cent.

    The draft Plan is on public exhibition at all Lake Mac Libraries and at Council’s Administration Building at Speers Point until 30 April.

    Have your say at shape.lakemac.com.au/aboriginal-community-plan.


  • Draft after dark plan open for bright ideas

    24 days ago
    Latemac tile for shape lake mac

    Lake Macquarie City Council is inviting feedback from the community on its draft action plan to help the City grow its night-time economy.

    Mayor of Lake Macquarie, Councillor Kay Fraser, said a healthy night-time economy will improve the liveability of Lake Macquarie and help the City realise its potential as a major economic driver within the Hunter region.

    “To ensure Lake Macquarie City remains competitive and attracts new investment and residents to the area, Council needs to create and support a suitable environment for a night-time economy,” Cr Fraser said.

    “Over the...

    Lake Macquarie City Council is inviting feedback from the community on its draft action plan to help the City grow its night-time economy.

    Mayor of Lake Macquarie, Councillor Kay Fraser, said a healthy night-time economy will improve the liveability of Lake Macquarie and help the City realise its potential as a major economic driver within the Hunter region.

    “To ensure Lake Macquarie City remains competitive and attracts new investment and residents to the area, Council needs to create and support a suitable environment for a night-time economy,” Cr Fraser said.

    “Over the past 18 months, through a number of community consultations, our community has told us they would like more to do after dark in Lake Macquarie.”

    In October last year, Council consulted with residents and local businesses to gather ideas and feedback about what activities, events and improvements they would like to see in Lake Macquarie City after dark. It was also an opportunity to identify any barriers preventing people from participating in the night-time economy.

    “From this consultation, we have developed a draft action plan, which sets the objectives, priorities and actions for Council to take over the next five years, to allow Lake Macquarie to become a vibrant and attractive night-time lifestyle and business destination in NSW,” Cr Fraser said.

    Some of the actions identified in the plan include:

    • trial creative lighting and other temporary lighting in key locations across the City;

    • investigate opportunities to assist groups to activate public spaces of an evening;

    • explore opportunities for night-time food markets, cinemas and family-friendly events in parks and public spaces; and

    • investigate the potential to extend opening hours for cultural venues and community facilities.

    To share your feedback on the draft Lake Macquarie Night-time Economy Action Plan, visit shape.lakemac.com.au/latemac.


  • Five-year plan outlines major changes for Lake Mac Libraries

    3 months ago
    Jacqui hemsley at speers point library  %28custom%29

    Libraries across Lake Macquarie will be overhauled – and in some cases relocated – over the next five years to reflect the changing needs of the community.

    A draft Five-Year Strategic/Business Plan on public exhibition from today calls for Lake Mac Libraries to embrace technology and transform into more active multi-use community facilities, incorporating digital hubs, workshop areas, museum and exhibition spaces.


    Libraries across Lake Macquarie will be overhauled – and in some cases relocated – over the next five years to reflect the changing needs of the community.

    A draft Five-Year Strategic/Business Plan on public exhibition from today calls for Lake Mac Libraries to embrace technology and transform into more active multi-use community facilities, incorporating digital hubs, workshop areas, museum and exhibition spaces.


  • Work begins on $1.4m Morisset playground and fitness zone

    4 months ago
    Bernie goodwin shape lake mac 2

    Work is underway on a $1.4 million Morisset playground upgrade to include children’s play equipment, outdoor fitness stations and new public barbecues.

    The first stage of work, which began this week, involves demolition of the existing outdated playground at Bernie Goodwin Memorial Park, with installation of modern, all-inclusive play equipment to follow.

    Lake Macquarie City Council conducted an online community survey earlier this year to determine what kind of equipment locals most wanted to see at the revamped site.

    Their input helped determine the new configuration, including a liberty swing, multi-play station, double bay swing, climbing equipment and rope playground...

    Work is underway on a $1.4 million Morisset playground upgrade to include children’s play equipment, outdoor fitness stations and new public barbecues.

    The first stage of work, which began this week, involves demolition of the existing outdated playground at Bernie Goodwin Memorial Park, with installation of modern, all-inclusive play equipment to follow.

    Lake Macquarie City Council conducted an online community survey earlier this year to determine what kind of equipment locals most wanted to see at the revamped site.

    Their input helped determine the new configuration, including a liberty swing, multi-play station, double bay swing, climbing equipment and rope playground across two separate sections catering for different age groups.

    One section will cater for children aged 2-5, while the second section will be for children aged 5-12.

    Council will also install new outdoor fitness equipment, including a dip station, balancing bench, fitness ladder and monkey bars, and new picnic tables and covered barbecues.

    Council’s Acting Manager Community Planning, Andrew Bryant, said the new facilities would provide a modern play space for families in Morisset to play and socialise.

    The works comprise the first stage of the Bernie Goodwin Memorial Park Master Plan.

    The project is jointly funded by the NSW Government’s Stronger Country Communities Fund and local development contributions.

    “The Master Plan will deliver new and improved facilities to better serve the greater Morisset community,” Mr Bryant said.

    “In addition to the new, larger playground, the plan also features a skate park, upgraded toilet amenities, native tree plantings and open space for a range of recreational activities.”

    The playground area is now closed for construction and is expected to reopen in April 2019.

    Nearby playgrounds can be found at:

    • Wyee Point Playground – Wymeera Circuit, Wyee Point
    • Pendlebury Park – Grand Parade, Bonnells Bay
    • Cooranbong Park – Freemans Drive, Cooranbong
    • Bonnells Bay Community Centre – Fishing Point Road, Bonnells Bay

    Mr Bryant said Council was seeking feedback from the community on the style of skate park to be built at Bernie Goodwin Memorial Park.

    Residents can share their ideas at shape.lakemac.com.au/skate-lake-mac. Construction is expected to begin on the skate park in the 2019-2020 financial year.


  • Consultation underway on three new Lake Mac skate parks

    4 months ago
    Shape lakemac tile 1080x1080

    Community consultation has begun on three new skate parks to be built in Lake Macquarie over the next 12 months.

    Lake Macquarie City Council Manager Community Planning Andrew Bryant said a total of more than $2 million would be spent on the new facilities flagged for Croudace Bay, Morisset and Windale.

    A unified “Skate Lake Mac” community consultation period covering all three sites begins today to seek input on each new skate park’s style and scale.

    “With the appropriate consultation, design and build, skate parks have fantastic potential to activate public spaces and generate significant community benefits,” Mr Bryant said.

    ...

    Community consultation has begun on three new skate parks to be built in Lake Macquarie over the next 12 months.

    Lake Macquarie City Council Manager Community Planning Andrew Bryant said a total of more than $2 million would be spent on the new facilities flagged for Croudace Bay, Morisset and Windale.

    A unified “Skate Lake Mac” community consultation period covering all three sites begins today to seek input on each new skate park’s style and scale.

    “With the appropriate consultation, design and build, skate parks have fantastic potential to activate public spaces and generate significant community benefits,” Mr Bryant said.

    “They promote active, healthy lifestyles, increase social opportunities for users and provide a place for young people to test their limits and learn from their peers.”

    The Croudace Bay skate park will form part of a wider revamp of Thomas H Halton Park and will either replace or build upon an existing skate park on the site.

    In Morisset, a skate park will be part of an expanded Bernie Goodwin Memorial Park, adjoining a new all-inclusive playground and outdoor fitness area.

    Windale’s new skate park will be built in Bahloo Reserve on South Street to replace the former skate park adjacent to the suburb’s PCYC.

    Mr Bryant said the Windale facility would be twice the size of its predecessor.

    “We’re hoping to hear from the community about the style of skate park they want at each site,” Mr Bryant said.

    “That means a choice of street, park, plaza, pump or combination styles. Morisset and Croudace Bay will also have the option of a transition style skate park.

    “However, given the proximity to the ChIP Bowl transition skate park at Charlestown, we’re not looking at that style for Windale.”

    Mr Bryant said undertaking combined community consultation for the three sites would ensure the best mix of facilities throughout the city.

    “Each site has its own benefits, features and limitations,” Mr Bryant said.

    “The common thread across each is our desire to provide the best, most exciting and most inclusive facility possible.”

    People can have their say on each of the three skate parks until Friday 14 December at shape.lakemac.com.au/skate-lake-mac.

    The move to expand skate park options in Lake Macquarie follows the September opening of Council’s $1 million ChIP Bowl skate park in Charlestown, and completion of a skate bowl and street-style plaza at Pasterfield Sports Complex, Cameron Park, in August.


  • Master plan to guide development in historic Lake Mac suburb

    6 months ago
    West wallsend square

    Work has begun on a heritage master plan to guide development of public spaces in one of Lake Macquarie’s most historically significant suburbs.

    West Wallsend was home to more than 6000 people and four booming coal mines at its peak in the early 1900s, giving rise to buildings and infrastructure that still stand today.

    Lake Macquarie City Council Integrated Planning Manager Wes Hain said consultation was underway on a West Wallsend Heritage Master Plan to reinforce and strengthen the suburb’s historic character, and to revitalise its retail and commercial precinct.

    “We want...

    Work has begun on a heritage master plan to guide development of public spaces in one of Lake Macquarie’s most historically significant suburbs.

    West Wallsend was home to more than 6000 people and four booming coal mines at its peak in the early 1900s, giving rise to buildings and infrastructure that still stand today.

    Lake Macquarie City Council Integrated Planning Manager Wes Hain said consultation was underway on a West Wallsend Heritage Master Plan to reinforce and strengthen the suburb’s historic character, and to revitalise its retail and commercial precinct.

    “We want to make sure any revitalisation of West Wallsend is sympathetic to its important and fascinating history,” Mr Hain said.

    “West Wallsend’s significant historical value is already recognised by its inclusion as a heritage conservation area in our Local Environment Plan, but a master plan will provide a blueprint for us to follow over the next 10-15 years.”

    Local mining historian Ed Tonks said the opening of the first colliery in West Wallsend in 1888 triggered rapid growth in the area.

    Within 15 years, the suburb had become home to thousands of miners and their families, with shops, hotels and eventually a steam tramway to Newcastle springing up to cater for the fledgling community.

    Mr Tonks cited West Wallsend as a prime example of how coal mining drove the Hunter Region’s early expansion.

    While the steam tramway and many other features of the early township are long gone, important reminders of that era remain.

    They include the Museum Hotel, the former Northumberland Hotel building and a collection of cooperative store buildings in the heart of the retail precinct.

    Mr Hain said the master plan would include a streetscape plan and separate pedestrian access and mobility plan, both focusing on the suburb’s historic central township around Carrington and Withers Streets.

    “Recent residential and commercial development around West Wallsend have the potential to affect the viability and long-term conservation of the old commercial precinct,” Mr Hain said.

    “But there is a great opportunity here to capitalise on West Wallsend’s rich history and use it to attract investment and business, and to create a vibrant, contemporary retail and commercial precinct.”

    The master plan will cover land owned or managed by Council, including footpaths, local roads and parks, but it won’t address development on privately owned land.

    “The next step is to hear from the community about what is most important to them,” Mr Hain said.

    “This will provide us with the core values and aspirations that will shape the master plan.”

    Public consultation is open until 23 November and includes an online portal (shape.lakemac.com.au/west-wallsend) where people can nominate buildings or items of greatest heritage significance in West Wallsend, list local issues of importance to them and provide ideas on how the suburb’s heritage significance can be better acknowledged.

    A community workshop will be held at Holmesville Community Hall on Wednesday 7 November from 5.30pm-6.30pm to further identify historical issues in West Wallsend. Interested community members can register via shape.lakemac.com.au/west-wallsend.


  • Draft targets aim for a greener Lake Mac future

    7 months ago
    Dora creek swing bridge2 %28custom%29

    Maintaining a green canopy covering more than half of Lake Macquarie and diverting more than 75 per cent of household waste from landfill are among the 10-year targets proposed for a new draft Environmental Sustainability Strategy.

    Lake Macquarie City Council is seeking community input to develop the strategy – an update on the city’s existing Environmental Sustainability Action Plan.

    Acting Manager Sustainability Chris Harle said the time had come for an overhaul of the original ESAP, adopted in 2011 and reviewed in 2014.

    “Lake Macquarie is one of the most liveable and ecologically diverse local government areas in NSW,” Ms...

    Maintaining a green canopy covering more than half of Lake Macquarie and diverting more than 75 per cent of household waste from landfill are among the 10-year targets proposed for a new draft Environmental Sustainability Strategy.

    Lake Macquarie City Council is seeking community input to develop the strategy – an update on the city’s existing Environmental Sustainability Action Plan.

    Acting Manager Sustainability Chris Harle said the time had come for an overhaul of the original ESAP, adopted in 2011 and reviewed in 2014.

    “Lake Macquarie is one of the most liveable and ecologically diverse local government areas in NSW,” Ms Harle said.

    “This review proposes the development of a plan that sets out our strategic directions, key themes and targets, and actions to deliver sustainable outcomes.

    “It looks at how we can continue to protect, sustain and enhance our natural landscapes, from the coast and the lake to the bush, the mountains and the places where urban development and nature meet.”

    Proposed targets for the draft ESS are divided across four broad themes:

    • Protecting and enhancing our natural landscapes;

    • Supporting resilient communities;

    • Creating an even more liveable city; and

    • Valuing our finite resources

    In total, 25 targets are proposed, with a 2027 deadline for reaching them.

    They include:

    • Maintaining at least 55 per cent native vegetation cover across Lake Macquarie;

    • Increasing lake and waterway health by 20 per cent, compared to a 2007 baseline;

    • Diverting 75 per cent of domestic and commercial waste from landfill;

    • Increasing the proportion of land in Lake Macquarie with a conservation status by five per cent, compared to a 2007 baseline; and

    • Doubling the ratio of infill development to greenfield development, compared to a 2007 baseline.

    “These are all important targets towards which we must strive,” Ms Harle said.

    “But this strategy will also cover other aspects aimed at creating a more safe, attractive and inclusive city.

    “Things like increasing the number of homes within 400m of a public transport stop, improving pedestrian access to our economic centres and providing residents with the information and resources they need to prepare for and respond to natural disasters and other adverse events.”

    Ms Harle urged the community to complete a survey and provide feedback on the draft strategy via shape.lakemac.com.au/ess.

    A short video outlining the plan is available here.

    Consultation closes Wednesday 31 October.


  • Mount Hutton's future outlined in draft plan

    8 months ago
    Residential development in ryhope st  mt hutton

    Mount Hutton would become an affordable housing hub with easy access to nearby services and facilities under a new plan to guide development and infrastructure in the suburb.

    The draft Mount Hutton Precinct Area Plan is now on public exhibition, with feedback sought on the changes it proposes to cope with the suburb’s growth.

    Lake Macquarie City Council Manager Integrated Planning Wes Hain said much had changed in Mount Hutton since the existing Area Plan was implemented in 2004.

    The suburb’s population increased by almost 11 per cent in the five years to the 2016 ...

    Mount Hutton would become an affordable housing hub with easy access to nearby services and facilities under a new plan to guide development and infrastructure in the suburb.

    The draft Mount Hutton Precinct Area Plan is now on public exhibition, with feedback sought on the changes it proposes to cope with the suburb’s growth.

    Lake Macquarie City Council Manager Integrated Planning Wes Hain said much had changed in Mount Hutton since the existing Area Plan was implemented in 2004.

    The suburb’s population increased by almost 11 per cent in the five years to the 2016 Census.

    “We’ve seen a lot of new development across Mount Hutton in the past five years and that is expected to continue,” Mr Hain said.

    “This plan provides controls to ensure the effective delivery and design of infrastructure, and the enhancement of key landscape and conservation features of the area.”

    The draft plan outlines construction of new or replacement infrastructure across parts of Mount Hutton, including road renewals, new roundabouts and traffic lights, shared pathways and upgraded stormwater drains.

    It proposes new on-road cycleways along Warners Bay Road, Violet Town Road and Helen Street.

    A new roundabout would be built at the corner of Wilsons Road and Violet Town Road, and new traffic lights at the Merrigum Street and South Street intersection would be installed to cope with increasing traffic.

    The draft plan also covers potential new road links, including connecting Glasshouse Ridge Road to Langdon Way, and separately to Sylva Place.

    However, it suggests removing a previously proposed new section of road linking Wilsons Road and Willow Road.

    Mr Hain said housing density guidelines in Mount Hutton would remain unchanged under the draft plan.

    “The aim is to strike a balance between built form and the natural landscape,” Mr Hain said.

    “A review concluded there was no current need to rezone additional land for medium density development, but a review in the next 5-10 years is recommended.”

    The draft Mount Hutton Precinct Area Plan and a related background study are on exhibition until 5pm Monday 10 September at shape.lakemac.com.au/mount-hutton-area-plan.

    Hard copies are also available at Speers Point, Charlestown, Windale and Belmont libraries, and at Council’s administration building.


  • Have your say on the future Toronto Foreshore

    8 months ago
    Torontotile

    Council is seeking ideas from the community to help transform the Toronto Foreshore into an attractive new community, tourist and lifestyle destination.

    The first phase of community consultation for the Toronto Foreshore Master Plan opens today.

    Manager Integrated Planning, Wes Hain, said Council wants to make the Toronto Foreshore a more inviting place for people by improving access and amenities and creating enticing destination points along the waterfront precinct fromGoffet Park to Bath Street.

    “This initial round of consultation is the first of a number of opportunities the community will have to tell us what sort of recreational infrastructure, amenities...

    Council is seeking ideas from the community to help transform the Toronto Foreshore into an attractive new community, tourist and lifestyle destination.

    The first phase of community consultation for the Toronto Foreshore Master Plan opens today.

    Manager Integrated Planning, Wes Hain, said Council wants to make the Toronto Foreshore a more inviting place for people by improving access and amenities and creating enticing destination points along the waterfront precinct fromGoffet Park to Bath Street.

    “This initial round of consultation is the first of a number of opportunities the community will have to tell us what sort of recreational infrastructure, amenities and environment they would like to see on the Toronto Foreshore,” Mr Hain said.

    “We are looking to revitalise underused areas of waterfront space, enhancing public access and amenities all along the extended foreshore precinct.

    “This is a great opportunity to realise the potential of one of our City’s most picturesque town centres and waterfront areas.”

    The Toronto Foreshore was identified as a priority for improvement in the Toronto Development Contributions Plan. Council has about $9 million in developer contributions to contribute to the project.

    As part of the consultation, the community will also have the chance to have a say on how the mixed-use commercial development proposed for a vacant site at 4 Bath Street and 1B Victory Row integrates with the foreshore precinct.

    Council determined in April to moved forward with the preparation of a design and development application for a medium-density building comprising a mix of residential, tourist and commercial space on the Council-owned Bath Street site.

    Community members can contribute ideas and comments on the Toronto Foreshore Master Plan online at shape.lakemac.com.au/future-toronto or by visiting one of the following drop-in sessions.

    • Wednesday 22 August - Toronto Town Square, 10am to noon.
    • Saturday 1 September - Toronto Farmers and Artisan Market, Toronto Foreshore, 9am to noon
    • Sunday 16 September - Toronto Lions Markets, Lions Park, Fennell Bay, 8am to 11am

    Consultation on the Toronto Foreshore Master Plan will remain open until 9am on Monday 24 September.