Wyee West Paper Subdivision

The Wyee West Paper Subdivision consists of 199 residential lots that are owned by more than 140 landowners.

While much of the land has been rezoned to allow for residential development, the land cannot be developed because it is not serviced with the necessary infrastructure such as roads, drainage, water, sewer and electricity.

Thank you to everyone who has provided feedback so far, Council is looking to work with local landowners to explore options for the future of the paper subdivision.

The Wyee West Paper Subdivision consists of 199 residential lots that are owned by more than 140 landowners.

While much of the land has been rezoned to allow for residential development, the land cannot be developed because it is not serviced with the necessary infrastructure such as roads, drainage, water, sewer and electricity.

Thank you to everyone who has provided feedback so far, Council is looking to work with local landowners to explore options for the future of the paper subdivision.

  • Highlights from meeting 12 of the Wyee West Paper Subdivision Development Plan Reference Group

    13 days ago

    Since the meeting in December, a number of planning studies for paper subdivision have been undertaken and reported to Council including geotechnical, bushfire threat, cultural heritage, archaeology and biodiversity. The most recent instalment was the biodiversity assessment report, which outlines requirements for offsetting the impact of future clearing within the residential-zoned part of the paper subdivision. Council staff are currently reviewing these reports which will be used to inform the engineering design.

    The engineering design contract has been awarded to ADW Johnson with expected delivery of the engineering design in September-October this year. This work will...

    Since the meeting in December, a number of planning studies for paper subdivision have been undertaken and reported to Council including geotechnical, bushfire threat, cultural heritage, archaeology and biodiversity. The most recent instalment was the biodiversity assessment report, which outlines requirements for offsetting the impact of future clearing within the residential-zoned part of the paper subdivision. Council staff are currently reviewing these reports which will be used to inform the engineering design.

    The engineering design contract has been awarded to ADW Johnson with expected delivery of the engineering design in September-October this year. This work will form the basis for detailed cost estimate which will be prepared by an experienced quantity surveyor.

    Following on from the presentation last meeting by CSIRO’s Dr John Ward on alternative energy supply options for the Wyee paper subdivision, a summary analysis of the five options and estimated costs is now available. If you have any comments or questions, please share them on Ask the project team a question.

    The Reference Group discussed a range of potential infrastructure contribution options for landowners. Comments reflected on containing all infrastructure costs as much as practicable for the benefit of landowners, living costs associated with the new infrastructure, complexity of administering numerous options, and the potential for land trading to help satisfy biodiversity conservation requirement. These options were designed to enable participation from a majority of landowners, if not all. Group members were asked to consider the options further and report back with any comments or additional inclusions. We intend to invite all paper subdivision landowners to consultation events once we have further investigated and refined the contributions options.

    The Reference Group was also asked to consider how Council could improve engagement with landowners. Many landowners have not made contact with Council’s project team. Greater engagement aims to increase the number of landowners participating in consultation activities and to ensure the process to create the Development Plan is inclusive, collaborative and accessible to all landowners. Suggestions are still being collected and reviewed. If you would like to tell us your preference or an idea for engaging landowners, share them on Ask the project team a question.

    Group members were also advised that the Hunter Water Wyee Sewer Scheme has a dedicated consultation site, find out more at: www.yourvoice.hunterwater.com.au/wyee-sewer.


  • Highlights from the final meeting for 2018 of the Wyee West Paper Subdivision Development Plan Reference Group

    5 months ago

    Following on from the presentation by CSIRO’s Dr John Ward, Science Director – Grids and Energy Efficient Systems at the September meeting, John returned this month to present his findings of alternative energy supply options for the Wyee paper subdivision.

    CSIRO investigated and analysed three alternative options:

    1. Business as usual, whereelectricity infrastructure is built to Ausgrid specifications and owned by Ausgrid.

    2. Subdivision is serviced by a private grid, with asingle point of connection to the Ausgrid network and landowners own the electricity distribution infrastructure (i.e. wires and transformers) within the subdivision.

    3. Private grid and automated energy demand...

    Following on from the presentation by CSIRO’s Dr John Ward, Science Director – Grids and Energy Efficient Systems at the September meeting, John returned this month to present his findings of alternative energy supply options for the Wyee paper subdivision.

    CSIRO investigated and analysed three alternative options:

    1. Business as usual, whereelectricity infrastructure is built to Ausgrid specifications and owned by Ausgrid.

    2. Subdivision is serviced by a private grid, with asingle point of connection to the Ausgrid network and landowners own the electricity distribution infrastructure (i.e. wires and transformers) within the subdivision.

    3. Private grid and automated energy demand management, is the same as option 2, but also includes smart technology to automatically regulate energy to minimise peak loads and the need to import (or export) electricity from outside the private grid.

    As part of this process, they looked at the solar photovoltaic hosting capacity, household energy use characteristics, network tariff options and energy management options, and the investigations concluded that all three options are viable.

    Council staff are currently reviewing the tender submissions for the complete engineering design for roads, drainage and reticulated water and sewer, power and other associated infrastructure for the subdivision. We hope to award the design contract before Christmas and expect this work to be completed by the middle of next year. This will allow us to get accurate costings and develop funding options, which we can discuss with landowners prior to finalising a development plan and holding a landowner ballot.

    We wish all the residents and landowners of the Wyee West Paper Subdivision a safe and merry Christmas and look forward to continuing our work with you in 2019.

  • Highlights from meeting ten of the Wyee West Paper Subdivision Development Plan Reference Group

    5 months ago

    The project reached a significant milestone this month, with Council issuing the tender for the complete engineering design for roads, drainage and reticulated water and sewer, power and other associated infrastructure for the subdivision. We hope to award the design contract next month and expect this work to be completed by the middle of next year. This will allow us to get accurate costings and develop funding options, which we can discuss with landowners prior to finalising a development plan and holding a landowner ballot.

    We have had consultants prepare a number of studies to help inform subdivision and infrastructure...

    The project reached a significant milestone this month, with Council issuing the tender for the complete engineering design for roads, drainage and reticulated water and sewer, power and other associated infrastructure for the subdivision. We hope to award the design contract next month and expect this work to be completed by the middle of next year. This will allow us to get accurate costings and develop funding options, which we can discuss with landowners prior to finalising a development plan and holding a landowner ballot.

    We have had consultants prepare a number of studies to help inform subdivision and infrastructure design. These include ecology, archaeology, geotechnical and bushfire.

    At November’s meeting, Council’s Chief Building Surveyor, Greg Brook and Principal Building Surveyor Gordon Dryburgh provided an update to the group on how Council’s compliance and building teams will be working together in early 2019 to undertake assessments of existing dwellings, and ascertain which ones may be able to be brought up to a satisfactory level of compliance. Gordon and Greg outlined how they will be looking to use the appropriate building codes for the time that a structure was built, i.e. if it is deemed a structure was built in 1980, the structure will be assessed against the building regulation used at that time, not 2018.

    In the coming months, Council is planning on carrying out temporary improvements to a number of unformed roads (namely Pirama, Tulkaba and Karakunba roads) to improve access and trafficability (similar to work carried out on Waropara Road in 2016).

  • The Wyee West Paper Subdivision Development Plan Reference Group met for the ninth time this month

    7 months ago

    A presentation from CSIRO’s Dr John Ward, Science Director – Grids and Energy Efficient Systems was the highlight of the September meeting, following Council’s engagement of CSIRO Energy Centre to investigate alternative energy supply options for the Wyee paper subdivision.

    Over the coming months, CSIRO will be investigating and analysing three alternative options:

    1. Business as usual, where electricity infrastructure is built to Ausgrid specifications and owned by Ausgrid.

    2. Subdivision is serviced by a private grid, with a single point of connection to the Ausgrid network and landowners own the electricity distribution infrastructure (i.e. wires and transformers) within the...

    A presentation from CSIRO’s Dr John Ward, Science Director – Grids and Energy Efficient Systems was the highlight of the September meeting, following Council’s engagement of CSIRO Energy Centre to investigate alternative energy supply options for the Wyee paper subdivision.

    Over the coming months, CSIRO will be investigating and analysing three alternative options:

    1. Business as usual, where electricity infrastructure is built to Ausgrid specifications and owned by Ausgrid.

    2. Subdivision is serviced by a private grid, with a single point of connection to the Ausgrid network and landowners own the electricity distribution infrastructure (i.e. wires and transformers) within the subdivision.

    3. Private grid and automated energy demand management, is the same as option 2, but also includes smart technology to automatically regulate energy to minimise peak loads and the need to import (or export) electricity from outside the private grid.

    CSIRO expects to present findings to reference group in November.

    Ongoing compliance monitoring activities are continuing within the subdivision, and there has been some recent success with landowners removing recently erected structures. The planning studies that will inform the design of new infrastructure (including biodiversity, archaeological, bushfire and geotechnical) are progressing well.

    Residents were also advised that the Hunter Water Wyee Sewer Scheme has a dedicated consultation site, find out more at: www.yourvoice.hunterwater.com.au/wyee-sewer.

  • Highlights from meeting eight of the Wyee West Paper Subdivision Development Plan Reference Group

    7 months ago

    The reference group met in late August and were provided an update on how the studies and investigations are progressing on the Development Plan for the Wyee West subdivision.

    The group also took the opportunity to reflect on how they’ve been working together so far and looking to the future.

    The rest of the meeting was focused on Council’s continued compliance effort to monitor the area for new unauthorised development, including support and advice for residents currently living in the paper subdivision to help achieve long-term development goals for the area.

    We intend to invite all paper subdivision landowners to...

    The reference group met in late August and were provided an update on how the studies and investigations are progressing on the Development Plan for the Wyee West subdivision.

    The group also took the opportunity to reflect on how they’ve been working together so far and looking to the future.

    The rest of the meeting was focused on Council’s continued compliance effort to monitor the area for new unauthorised development, including support and advice for residents currently living in the paper subdivision to help achieve long-term development goals for the area.

    We intend to invite all paper subdivision landowners to consultation events once we have further refined both the contributions options, and our strategy for addressing existing development.

    We’d encourage any interested residents who’d like to know more, to contact us through the online portal (click on the “Ask the Project Team a Question” tab), email or phone.

  • A wrap up of the seventh meeting of the Wyee West Paper Subdivision Development Plan Reference Group

    9 months ago

    The reference group met in early July and received updates on the status of consultant studies for the paper subdivision, including ecology, archaeology and cultural heritage, and geotechnical. A bushfire study is planned to commence in the coming weeks.

    The group also further discussed options for infrastructure contributions, with a view to ensuring an infrastructure solution that is both equitable and affordable for all landowners.

    In addition to an upfront payment, other options under investigation are:

    • a deferred payment scheme that would allow a landowner to pay a deposit prior to commencement of infrastructure...

    The reference group met in early July and received updates on the status of consultant studies for the paper subdivision, including ecology, archaeology and cultural heritage, and geotechnical. A bushfire study is planned to commence in the coming weeks.

    The group also further discussed options for infrastructure contributions, with a view to ensuring an infrastructure solution that is both equitable and affordable for all landowners.

    In addition to an upfront payment, other options under investigation are:

    • a deferred payment scheme that would allow a landowner to pay a deposit prior to commencement of infrastructure works and the balance (including interest) within a few months of completion of works (potentially allowing landowners to borrow against the value of their serviced lot)
    • a land trading scheme available to owners of multiple lots or other lots considered to have subdivision potential (this would basically allow owners to pay for infrastructure with land instead of cash)
    • full dedication of land prior to infrastructure works and receipt of profit after sale of serviced lot and recovery of Council’s costs. (This would allow a landowner of a vacant lot to receive any profit from the uplift in property value achieved because of infrastructure works).
    • a voluntary charge on the Land Title that would require the infrastructure cost (plus accrued interest) to be repaid to Council when the property transfers. It would be up to the landowner to decide whether they make any repayments in the meantime. This option would likely only be offered to landowners for whom the paper subdivision is currently their principal place of residence.

    The rest of the meeting was focused on Council’s continued compliance effort to monitor the area for new unauthorised development, including support and advice for residents currently living in the paper subdivision to help achieve long-term development goals for the area.

    We intend to invite all paper subdivision landowners to consultation events once we have further refined both the contributions options, and our strategy for addressing existing development.

    We’d encourage any interested residents who’d like to know more, to contact us through the online portal (click on the “Ask the Project Team a Question” tab), email or phone.

  • Wyee West Paper Subdivision Development Plan Reference Group meeting six

    11 months ago

    The focus of the most recent meeting was exploring ideas for infrastructure contributions by landowners. In summary, the current options under investigation are:

    1. Upfront payment (may involve a landowner-obtained mortgage)
    2. Land trading (offered to owners of multiple lots and owners of lots with subdivision potential)
    3. Voluntary sale of lot to Council
    4. Deferred payment option through a charge on Title of land by agreement (option subject to means-testing and legal advice).

    Over the coming months, we will further develop these options with a view to arriving at an infrastructure solution that is both equitable and affordable for all landowners.

    Council officers...

    The focus of the most recent meeting was exploring ideas for infrastructure contributions by landowners. In summary, the current options under investigation are:

    1. Upfront payment (may involve a landowner-obtained mortgage)
    2. Land trading (offered to owners of multiple lots and owners of lots with subdivision potential)
    3. Voluntary sale of lot to Council
    4. Deferred payment option through a charge on Title of land by agreement (option subject to means-testing and legal advice).

    Over the coming months, we will further develop these options with a view to arriving at an infrastructure solution that is both equitable and affordable for all landowners.

    Council officers also advised that Council is doing its best to expedite preparation of the Development Plan by commencing infrastructure design work prior to receiving final results of environmental studies.

    We are also looking at the potential to incorporate sustainable energy technology within the subdivision that would reduce reliance on conventional electricity infrastructure.

    Our compliance staff are continuing to monitor the area for new unauthorised development. Council reinforced that restricting further development until essential services are in place is necessary to limit the number of residents living in potentially unsafe conditions, and to help achieve long-term development goals for the area.

    We will be providing a more formal update to all landowners in the coming months that will include information on how we plan to consult landowners about the preparation of the Development Plan.

  • What happened at Wyee West Paper Subdivision Development Plan Reference Group meeting five

    about 1 year ago

    At this month’s meeting on 12 April, the group discussed the recent community meeting hosted by Member for Lake Macquarie, Greg Piper and Hunter Water on the Wyee sewer scheme, and potential implications for the paper subdivision. You can find out more about the Wyee Sewer Scheme at Hunter Water’s website.

    Council officers gave an update on other matters relevant to the paper subdivision, including upcoming meetings with CSIRO to discuss sustainable energy technologies for residential estates. The group was also advised that geotechnical and archaeological consultants will soon be appointed to undertake studies for ...

    At this month’s meeting on 12 April, the group discussed the recent community meeting hosted by Member for Lake Macquarie, Greg Piper and Hunter Water on the Wyee sewer scheme, and potential implications for the paper subdivision. You can find out more about the Wyee Sewer Scheme at Hunter Water’s website.

    Council officers gave an update on other matters relevant to the paper subdivision, including upcoming meetings with CSIRO to discuss sustainable energy technologies for residential estates. The group was also advised that geotechnical and archaeological consultants will soon be appointed to undertake studies for the area. This work is a precursor to engineering design, which will allow us to accurately estimate construction costs.

    In the coming months, we will be exploring in more detail how these infrastructure costs can be paid for by landowners in a way that is both equitable and affordable.

    Our compliance staff are actively monitoring the area for new unauthorised development. Council reiterated its position that restricting further development until essential services are in place is necessary to limit the number of residents living in potentially unsafe conditions, and to help achieve long-term development goals for the area.

  • What we discussed at meeting four of the Wyee West Paper Subdivision Development Plan Reference Group

    about 1 year ago

    At this month’s meeting on 15 March, the group received a presentation from Habitat for Humanity – a not-for-profit organisation that helps low-income families achieve the dream of building and owning their own home. They also help disadvantaged families through their Brush with Kindness program.

    Brush with Kindness mobilises teams of volunteers to conduct landscaping and minor repairs to the exterior of homes of people who may be disadvantaged, disabled or socially isolated. You can find out more about Habitat’s programs at their website, https://habitat.org.au/.

    Habitat indicated they might be able...

    At this month’s meeting on 15 March, the group received a presentation from Habitat for Humanity – a not-for-profit organisation that helps low-income families achieve the dream of building and owning their own home. They also help disadvantaged families through their Brush with Kindness program.

    Brush with Kindness mobilises teams of volunteers to conduct landscaping and minor repairs to the exterior of homes of people who may be disadvantaged, disabled or socially isolated. You can find out more about Habitat’s programs at their website, https://habitat.org.au/.

    Habitat indicated they might be able to assist Wyee West paper subdivision residents in the future. A number of existing residents will require assistance either to bring their homes “up to code” or rebuild where the existing structures are not suitable for permanent occupation. Council will continue to explore this potential partnership over the coming months.

    Council officers gave an update on other matters relevant to the paper subdivision, including recent meetings with Hunter Water Corporation and Landcom. Council requested that Hunter Water’s proposed Wyee Sewer Scheme be designed with the capacity to service the paper subdivision and other future development in the Gorokan Road area. Discussions were also held with the project team at Landcom working on developing the Riverstone Scheduled Lands – a paper subdivision in north west Sydney. Landcom agreed to share information with Council that may assist with the development of Wyee West.

    The group was also advised that Council had recently engaged an ecological consulting firm who will commence fieldwork within the paper subdivision in late March. We will also soon appoint geotechnical and archaeological consultants to undertake studies for the area. These are the first of a number of studies being undertaken over the coming months that will form the basis for detailed engineering plans for roads and infrastructure. This work will allow us to accurately estimate construction costs.

    In the coming weeks and months, we will be exploring how these infrastructure costs can be paid for by landowners in a way that is both equitable and affordable.

    Our compliance staff are continuing to monitor the area for new unauthorised development. Council reiterated its position that the welfare and safety of its residents is its number one priority, and that restricting further development until essential services are in place reflects this position.

  • A snapshot of what was discussed at meeting three of the Wyee West Paper Subdivision Development Plan Reference Group

    about 1 year ago

    The Wyee West Paper Subdivision Development Plan Reference Group met again on Thursday 15 February. They received a briefing from specialist Council staff involved in the regulation of on-site sewer management (OSSM) systems.

    In summary, this presentation covered:

    • Council is responsible for assessing applications for on-site sewer management (OSSM) systems and the ongoing regulation of those systems.
    • Standards for OSSM systems have become much more stringent over time (due to greater understanding of potential health and environmental impact of OSSM systems).
    • OSSM systems require a large area of land (typically 4000m2) for...

    The Wyee West Paper Subdivision Development Plan Reference Group met again on Thursday 15 February. They received a briefing from specialist Council staff involved in the regulation of on-site sewer management (OSSM) systems.

    In summary, this presentation covered:

    • Council is responsible for assessing applications for on-site sewer management (OSSM) systems and the ongoing regulation of those systems.
    • Standards for OSSM systems have become much more stringent over time (due to greater understanding of potential health and environmental impact of OSSM systems).
    • OSSM systems require a large area of land (typically 4000m2) for effective treatment of household effluent.
    • Soils in Wyee are not well-suited to assimilation of wastewater, meaning larger areas are generally required in order to ensure no off-site impacts from OSSM systems.
    • While modern composting toilets are a space-efficient option, other wastewater streams (kitchen, bathroom and laundry) pose similar environmental and public health risks and still require treatment and disposal.
    • The more constrained the site (i.e. poor soils and small lot-size), the more expensive the OSSM system would likely be.
    • Pump-out systems are costly to install and require servicing fortnightly at a cost (currently) of $2480 per year.
    • For the reasons described above, individual OSSM systems are not a viable solution for servicing the Wyee paper subdivision, which consists of 184 residential-zoned lots with an average lot size of 800m2.

    Following this briefing, Council advised it would soon be engaging an ecological consulting firm who will likely commence fieldwork within the paper subdivision in late March. We will also soon appoint geotechnical and archaeological consultants to undertake studies for the area.

    These are the first of a number of studies being undertaken over the coming months that will feed into detailed engineering plans for roads and infrastructure. It is this work that will allow us to accurately estimate construction costs.

    Our compliance staff are continuing to monitor the area for unauthorised development. It has been pleasing to say that the majority of landowners have complied with Council’s requests and ceased any developments on their properties.

    Council reiterated its position that the welfare and safety of its residents is its number one priority.

    We look forward to working with all landowners as well as the Reference Group to explore and progress options for the future of the paper subdivision.