Wyee Paper Subdivision

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The Wyee Paper Subdivision consists of 199 residential lots that are owned by more than 140 landowners.

While much of the land has been rezoned to allow for residential development, the land cannot be developed because it is not serviced with the necessary infrastructure such as roads, drainage, water, sewer and electricity.

Thank you to everyone who has provided feedback so far, Council is looking to work with local landowners to explore options for the future of the paper subdivision.


The Wyee Paper Subdivision consists of 199 residential lots that are owned by more than 140 landowners.

While much of the land has been rezoned to allow for residential development, the land cannot be developed because it is not serviced with the necessary infrastructure such as roads, drainage, water, sewer and electricity.

Thank you to everyone who has provided feedback so far, Council is looking to work with local landowners to explore options for the future of the paper subdivision.

  • Wyee West Paper Subdivision Development Plan Reference Group meeting six

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    The focus of the most recent meeting was exploring ideas for infrastructure contributions by landowners. In summary, the current options under investigation are:

    1. Upfront payment (may involve a landowner-obtained mortgage)
    2. Land trading (offered to owners of multiple lots and owners of lots with subdivision potential)
    3. Voluntary sale of lot to Council
    4. Deferred payment option through a charge on Title of land by agreement (option subject to means-testing and legal advice).

    Over the coming months, we will further develop these options with a view to arriving at an infrastructure solution that is both equitable and affordable for all landowners.

    Council officers also advised that Council is doing its best to expedite preparation of the Development Plan by commencing infrastructure design work prior to receiving final results of environmental studies.

    We are also looking at the potential to incorporate sustainable energy technology within the subdivision that would reduce reliance on conventional electricity infrastructure.

    Our compliance staff are continuing to monitor the area for new unauthorised development. Council reinforced that restricting further development until essential services are in place is necessary to limit the number of residents living in potentially unsafe conditions, and to help achieve long-term development goals for the area.

    We will be providing a more formal update to all landowners in the coming months that will include information on how we plan to consult landowners about the preparation of the Development Plan.

  • What happened at Wyee West Paper Subdivision Development Plan Reference Group meeting five

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    At this month’s meeting on 12 April, the group discussed the recent community meeting hosted by Member for Lake Macquarie, Greg Piper and Hunter Water on the Wyee sewer scheme, and potential implications for the paper subdivision. You can find out more about the Wyee Sewer Scheme at Hunter Water’s website.

    Council officers gave an update on other matters relevant to the paper subdivision, including upcoming meetings with CSIRO to discuss sustainable energy technologies for residential estates. The group was also advised that geotechnical and archaeological consultants will soon be appointed to undertake studies for the area. This work is a precursor to engineering design, which will allow us to accurately estimate construction costs.

    In the coming months, we will be exploring in more detail how these infrastructure costs can be paid for by landowners in a way that is both equitable and affordable.

    Our compliance staff are actively monitoring the area for new unauthorised development. Council reiterated its position that restricting further development until essential services are in place is necessary to limit the number of residents living in potentially unsafe conditions, and to help achieve long-term development goals for the area.

  • What we discussed at meeting four of the Wyee West Paper Subdivision Development Plan Reference Group

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    At this month’s meeting on 15 March, the group received a presentation from Habitat for Humanity – a not-for-profit organisation that helps low-income families achieve the dream of building and owning their own home. They also help disadvantaged families through their Brush with Kindness program.

    Brush with Kindness mobilises teams of volunteers to conduct landscaping and minor repairs to the exterior of homes of people who may be disadvantaged, disabled or socially isolated. You can find out more about Habitat’s programs at their website, https://habitat.org.au/.

    Habitat indicated they might be able to assist Wyee West paper subdivision residents in the future. A number of existing residents will require assistance either to bring their homes “up to code” or rebuild where the existing structures are not suitable for permanent occupation. Council will continue to explore this potential partnership over the coming months.

    Council officers gave an update on other matters relevant to the paper subdivision, including recent meetings with Hunter Water Corporation and Landcom. Council requested that Hunter Water’s proposed Wyee Sewer Scheme be designed with the capacity to service the paper subdivision and other future development in the Gorokan Road area. Discussions were also held with the project team at Landcom working on developing the Riverstone Scheduled Lands – a paper subdivision in north west Sydney. Landcom agreed to share information with Council that may assist with the development of Wyee West.

    The group was also advised that Council had recently engaged an ecological consulting firm who will commence fieldwork within the paper subdivision in late March. We will also soon appoint geotechnical and archaeological consultants to undertake studies for the area. These are the first of a number of studies being undertaken over the coming months that will form the basis for detailed engineering plans for roads and infrastructure. This work will allow us to accurately estimate construction costs.

    In the coming weeks and months, we will be exploring how these infrastructure costs can be paid for by landowners in a way that is both equitable and affordable.

    Our compliance staff are continuing to monitor the area for new unauthorised development. Council reiterated its position that the welfare and safety of its residents is its number one priority, and that restricting further development until essential services are in place reflects this position.

  • A snapshot of what was discussed at meeting three of the Wyee West Paper Subdivision Development Plan Reference Group

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    The Wyee West Paper Subdivision Development Plan Reference Group met again on Thursday 15 February. They received a briefing from specialist Council staff involved in the regulation of on-site sewer management (OSSM) systems.

    In summary, this presentation covered:

    • Council is responsible for assessing applications for on-site sewer management (OSSM) systems and the ongoing regulation of those systems.
    • Standards for OSSM systems have become much more stringent over time (due to greater understanding of potential health and environmental impact of OSSM systems).
    • OSSM systems require a large area of land (typically 4000m2) for effective treatment of household effluent.
    • Soils in Wyee are not well-suited to assimilation of wastewater, meaning larger areas are generally required in order to ensure no off-site impacts from OSSM systems.
    • While modern composting toilets are a space-efficient option, other wastewater streams (kitchen, bathroom and laundry) pose similar environmental and public health risks and still require treatment and disposal.
    • The more constrained the site (i.e. poor soils and small lot-size), the more expensive the OSSM system would likely be.
    • Pump-out systems are costly to install and require servicing fortnightly at a cost (currently) of $2480 per year.
    • For the reasons described above, individual OSSM systems are not a viable solution for servicing the Wyee paper subdivision, which consists of 184 residential-zoned lots with an average lot size of 800m2.

    Following this briefing, Council advised it would soon be engaging an ecological consulting firm who will likely commence fieldwork within the paper subdivision in late March. We will also soon appoint geotechnical and archaeological consultants to undertake studies for the area.

    These are the first of a number of studies being undertaken over the coming months that will feed into detailed engineering plans for roads and infrastructure. It is this work that will allow us to accurately estimate construction costs.

    Our compliance staff are continuing to monitor the area for unauthorised development. It has been pleasing to say that the majority of landowners have complied with Council’s requests and ceased any developments on their properties.

    Council reiterated its position that the welfare and safety of its residents is its number one priority.

    We look forward to working with all landowners as well as the Reference Group to explore and progress options for the future of the paper subdivision.

  • Outcomes from meeting two of the Wyee West Paper Subdivision Development Plan Reference Group

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    The Wyee West Paper Subdivision Development Plan Reference Group met for the second time on Thursday 7 December. They reviewed the Paper Subdivisions legislation and highlighted a number of important items to be included in a Development Plan, including:

    • Details of subdivision works to be undertaken for the land
    • Details of the cost of subdivision works
    • Details of costs of preparing the Development Plan
    • Details of the proportion of costs to be met by each landowner and the manner in which owners may meet these costs

    The Reference Group will meet again in February to discuss potential funding options and how the Paper Subdivisions legislation has been used by Landcom for the Riverstone Scheduled Lands.

    After every meeting, Council will upload details and outcomes of the Reference Group so all landowners are kept in the loop.

    Council looks forward to working with all landowners as well as the Reference Group to explore progress options for the future of the paper subdivision.

  • Wyee West Paper Subdivision Development Plan Reference Group meeting one

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    The Wyee West Paper Subdivision Development Plan Reference Group met for the first time on Tuesday 28 November. The Group, consisting of six landowners, three Council staff and three Lake Macquarie Councillors – Cr David Belcher, Cr John Gilbert and Cr Nick Jones – spent the evening getting to know each other better and explored how the group will work together over the next 12 or so months.

    They discussed the Reference Group’s purpose including to assist in formulating a Development Plan, acting as a conduit between the Council and other landowners, and helping consider the implications for existing paper subdivision residents in the implementation of a Development Plan.

    The Reference Group will meet again in early December to learn more about the Paper Subdivisions legislation, before taking a break over Christmas and meeting again in February 2018.

    After every meeting, Council will upload details and outcomes of the Reference Group so all landowners are kept in the loop. Stay tuned for another update in the near future where we will introduce group members.

    Council looks forward to working with all landowners as well as the Reference Group to explore options for the future of the paper subdivision.

Page last updated: 05 Apr 2022, 11:32 AM